Showing posts with label scotland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label scotland. Show all posts

05 April 2014

"The dream of the rood" : one of the earliest anglo-saxon christian poems


ASNØC
http://asnoc.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/cropped-6851076846_8ea95a861f_b.jpg
Published, edited, annotated (in red) & images added by Kenneth S. Doig http://asnoc.wordpress.com/2012/08/31/toward-a-ritual-poetics-dream-of-the-rood-as-a-case-study-2/
http://www.memrise.com/course/87844/the-dream-of-the-rood/
(from Wikipedia)
The Dream of the Rood is one of the earliest christian poems in the corpus of Old-English (OE) literature and an example of dream-poetry genre. Like most OE poetry, it is written in alliterative verse. 
Ruthwell Cross, Scotland
Rood is from the OE word ród 'pole',(ród is cognate to our common-word rod & to the less-common rood) or more specifically crucifix. Preserved in the 10th century Vercelli Book, the poem may be considerably older, even one of the oldest works of OE literature.

Background information
A part of The Dream of the Rood can be found on the 8th century Ruthwell Cross, which was an 18 feet (5.5 m), free-standing Anglo-Saxon (AS) cross that was perhaps intended as a 'conversion-tool'. 

At each side of the vine-tracery are carved runes. On the cross there is an excerpt that was written in runes along with scenes of Jesus' healing the blind, the annunciation and the story of Egypt. 

Although it was torn down and destroyed during a protestant revolt, it was reconstructed as much as possible after the fear of iconography passed. 

Fortunately during that time of religious unrest, those words that were in the runes were still protected in the Vercelli Book, so called because                        the book is kept in the Italian city of Vercelli.

07 November 2013

The Picts of Albann


Published, edited & annotated (in red) by Kenneth S. Doig
The Picts of Albann


by Hal MacGregor

Who They Were, Where They Came From,
Their Relationship With The "Dalriadic Scots",
What Happened To Them & Their Effect on Europe

A Comprehensive Study of the Celts, Picts & Scots:
And Their Interrelationships

Peoples of Caledonia


Published, edited, annotated (in red) & images added by Kenneth S. Doig

(websource
by Scott Martin
Peoples of Caledonia 
If western Europe is barbaric, then Caledonia is downright primitive. Much of the land is untouched wilderness. The scattered inhabitants lives in tiny villages or isolated farmsteads. The cities are nothing more than fortified centers with populations of a few hundred. Caledonia is inhabited by five different peoples: Picts, Scots, Britons, Angles, and Northmen.


The Picts
The Picts are the oldest inhabitants of Caledonia, which derives its name from one of their ancient tribes, the Caledonii, who dominated the area when the Romans first arrived. The Picts are a small, dark (there are so many contradicting descriptions of the Pictish phenotype. Many reputable ancient Graeco-Roman

06 November 2013

Are the "Scots" descended from the Asian-Steppe nomads, chariot-warriors, the Indo-Aryan, Iranian-speaking Scyths



Published, edited, annotated (in red) & certain images added by Kenneth S. Doig

(websource)


Written by Hal MacGregor
Prologue- The Picts were definitely not Gaels, they spoke a different language and had different customs. Their origins are unknown, although there are many theories, and the Picts themselves had their myths and traditions which compounded their mystery. 

23 December 2012

Celtic History


Published, formatted, edited, images (except, where noted) & annotations/comments (in red) by Kenneth S. Doig


General Celtic Info


The Celts dominated Mid- and West-Europe for a thousand years. But it is only recently that the importance of Celtic influence on the cultural, linguistic and artistic development of Europe. 

The Celts as an identifiable race or ethnic group have long since disappeared, except in places such as Ireland and the Scottish Highlands.

27 July 2012

Etymologies of British placenames (England, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall, Mann)



Published, edited, formatted, images added & annotated (in red) by Kenneth S. Doig

(Wikipedia)

Elements

Key to languages: Bry. Brythonic; C - Cumbric; K - Cornish; I - Irish; L - Latin; ME - Middle English; NF - Norman French; OE - Old English; ON - Old Norse; P - Pictish; SG -Scots Gaelic; W - Welsh

Term Origin Meaning Example Position Comments
aber C, W, P, K mouth (of a river), confluence, a meeting of waters Aberystwyth, Aberdyfi,Aberdeen, Aberuthven prefix
ac, acc, ock OE ác acorn, or oak tree Accrington, Acomb,Acton, Matlock

Celtic History : General Celtic Info





PUBLISHED, EDITED, FORMATTED, IMAGES ADDED & ANNOTATED (IN RED) BY KENNETH S. DOIG


 (websource)
Celtic History
     
General Celtic Info

The Celts dominated Mid and Western Europe for a thousand years. But it is only recently that the importance of Celtic influence on the cultural, linguistic and artistic development of Europe. 

The Celts as an identifiable race or ethnic group have long since disappeared, except in places such as Ireland and the Scottish Highlands.

The Celts transmitted their culture orally, never writing down history or facts. This accounts for the extreme lack of knowledge about them prior to their contact with the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome.

16 July 2012

Scotti, Scottas, Dalriata, Gaels, Picts & Eire


C. 550 AD
PUBLISHED, FORMATTED, EDITED & ANNOTATED (IN RED) BY KENNETH S. DOIG


(Wikipedia)
Scoti or Scotti was the generic name used by the Romans to describe those who sailed from Ireland to conduct raids on Roman Britain. It was thus synonymous with the modern term Gaels


In the 5th century, these raiders established the kingdom of Dál Riata along the west coast of Scotland. 




As this kingdom expanded in size and influence, the name was applied to all its subjects – hence the modern terms Scot, Scottish and Scotland.


The origin of the word Scoti or Scotti is uncertain. Charles Oman derives it from the Gaelic word Scuit (a man cut-off), suggesting that a Scuit was not a general word for the Gael but a band of outcast raiders. 


In the 19th century Aonghas MacCoinnich of Glasgow proposed that Scoti was derived from the Gaelic word Sgaothaich. It has also been suggested that it comes from the Greek word skotos (σκότος) meaning darkness.


Scotland takes its name from Scotus which in Latin translates into Irishman (masculine form of Scoti).

13 January 2012

"MYTHS OF BABYLONIA & ASSYRIA" : CHAPTER II : "THE LANDS OF RIVERS & THE GOD OF THE DEEP"

FERTILE CRESCENT/MESOPOTAMIA IN EARLY ANTIQUITY 
PUBLISHED, FORMATTED, IMAGES ADDED & ANNOTATIONS (IN RED) BY KENNETH S. DOIG
IRON-AGE RACE/ETHNICITIES OF WESTERN
EURASIA & NORTH-AFRICA (FROM, "THE
RACES OF EUROPE" (1939), CARLETON
COON, PhD

By Donald A. Mackenzie
(websource)

Chapter II. The Land of Rivers and the God of the Deep

Hebrew
HEBREW: BLUE-EYED
REDDISH BEARD


  
Abstract: Fertility of Ancient Babylonia--Rivers, Canals, Seasons, and Climate--Early Trade and Foreign Influences--Local Religious Cults--Ea, God of the Deep, identical with Oannes of Berosus--Origin as a Sacred Fish--Compared with Brahma and Vishnu--Flood Legends in Babylonia and India--Fish Deities in Babylonia and Egypt--Fish God as a Corn God--The River as Creator--Ea an Artisan God, and links with Egypt and India--Ea as the Hebrew Jah--Ea and Varuna are Water and Sky Gods--The Babylonian Dagan and Dagon of the Philistines--Deities of Water and Harvest in Phoenicia, Greece, Rome, Scotland, Scandinavia, Ireland, and Egypt--Ea's Spouse Damkina--Demons of Ocean in Babylonia and India--Anu, God of the Sky--Enlil, Storm and War God of Nippur, like Adad, Odin, &c.--Early Gods of Babylonia and Egypt of common origin--Ea's City as Cradle of Sumerian Civilization.


BABYLONIAN EMPIRE
Ancient Babylonia was for over four thousand years the garden of Western Asia. In the days of Hezekiah and Isaiah, when it had come under the sway of the younger civilization of Assyria on the north, it was "a land of corn and wine, a land of bread and vineyards, a land of oil olive and of honey[28]". 

06 December 2011

ONLINE SCOTTISH-GAELIC GRAMMAR (PART I)

SIR THOMAS 'SEAN' CONNERY
A.K.A., "BOND, JAMES BOND..."
ARGUABLY SCOTLAND'S MOST
FAMOUS PERSON IN THE LAST
HALF-CENTURY 
PUBLISHED BY KENNETH S. DOIG ("Kenneth" is originally from Irish-Gaelic (The name Kenneth derives from the Gaelic “Cinaed” or “Cionaed” meaning “born of fire” or “Coinneach” or “Caoineach” meaning “comely” or “handsome.” From there, it became the Scottish “Kenneth.” Kenneth I MacAlpin was the first king of Scotland in the 9th century. The name has been popular in Scotland ever since. Two other rulers of Scotland have borne the name. [wiki] name.com
 'Kenneth' is common in both Eire and Scotland. Doig is a uniquely Scottish-Gaelic surname. It is one of the few Gaelic [usually partially or completely Anglicized, surnames that is NOT shared by both the Irish and the Scots as the name did not come into existence until after the Dalriatic Scots [Gaels or Goidelic Celts] from Ireland had settled in modern-day Scotland) 

GLENCOE, IN THE SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS. GAELIC'S
TRADITIONAL HOME-AREA IN SCOTLAND

(Gaelic: Not to be confused with Scots [Scots is a Germanic language based on Northern Old-English] language or Scottish-English. [Scottish-English "SE" is essentially standard-UK English with a Scottish accent with quite a few dialectal terms, idiomatic differences, etc. SE is mutually intelligible with London, Australian, American English while Scots is NOT! Gaelic belongs to an entirely different branch [Celtic] of the same Indo-European [IE] language-phylum to which the Germanic branch e.g., English, Scots, Norse, Swedish, German, Dutch, Gothic, Anglo-Saxon, etc., belong. While English would be a sibling to Swedish, Danish, Icelandic, German, etc., Celtic, e.g., Welsh or Gaelic would be like third-cousins.


 You [with no linguistic training whatsoever] would recognized  immediately that any [written] Germanic language is related to English and you would understand 100s if not 1000s of words. Not so with modern insular [British Isles & Brittany] Celtic. Even I as a trained expert have a very difficult time seeing the relationships of many cognates. Modern Celtic's structure, word-order, everything is so untypically IE. 

But if you were to look at ancient Gaulish Celtic, it would be much more recognizable, especially if you've studied Latin. Gaelic, for me, is unlearnable beyond a few phrases and words. I believe the easiest language for a native English-speaker to learn is Swedish, then Norwegian, hands down! K.Doig)

Scottish-Gaelic (Scottish Gaelic: Gàidhlig)is a Celtic language native to Scotland. A member of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish (or Irish-Gaelic) and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish, and thus descends ultimately from Primitive Irish.

The 2001 UK Census showed that a total of 58,652 (1.2% of the Scottish population aged over three years old) in Scotland had some Gaelic ability at that time, with the Outer Hebrides being the main

25 October 2011

ANCIENT FOUNDATIONS : SCOTLAND, AN AMALGAM OF CELTIC BRITONS, CELTIC GAELS, THE IRISH DÁLRIATIC SCOTS, PICTS, LIKELY CELTS, AND TEUTONIC ANGLES



PUBLISHED BY KENNETH S. DOIG

It is believed that the first people who inhabited Scotland came from the south. What we know today is that they lived in shelters made of wood and skins and that they made different kinds of stone tools (arrowheads, blades, flakes and awls). They were nomadic communities who lived by hunting and fishing, and traces of their way of life were found at Kinloch on the Island of Rum in the Inner Hebrides. They made all sorts of stone jewelry and their houses were of stone, like the ones found on the Bay of Skaill on the west coast of Orkney.


Some of these places were abandoned and Archeologists can't explain why. However, they left magnificent stone circles like the ones at Stenness, the Ring of Brogar and Callanish on the Isle of Lewis. Until today these stones circles are an enigma. Yet, Archeologists don't know if these places were temples or astronomical observatories. Scotland was populated by four separate groups of people.

The Picts lived mostly in the north and northeast and may have spoke a kind of Celtic language which was lost completely. The Scots were Celtic settlers who moved into the western Highlands from Ireland in the fourth century. The third group were the Britons, who inhabited the Lowlands and it is believed that they gave up their old tribal way of life by the sixth century.

27 August 2011

The Doig family and Scottish History: a timeline

Tartan image: Doig (Personal)
The Doig "personal" tartan.Designed by Arthur
Mackie of  Strathmore Woollen Co. of Forfar,
Scotland. Commissioned by R Doig & Son of Forfar
as a Family tartan. Based on the Drummond
of Perth of which Doig is a sept.
Different warp & weft.
PUBLISHED & ANNOTATED (IN RED) BY KENNETH S. DOIG
 
The Doig family and Scottish History: a timeline


 This page is mirrored at Doig.net. (My uncle Ken's site)

Stone Age Pre-Celtic Beaker people and Tumulus people live in Britain Stone Age Neolithic tumuli (barrow tombs) built at Craighead and Blair Drummond

Bronze Age Several cairns built in the Thornhill / Doune / Frew area

GENERAL CELTIC INFO


Published by K.S.Doig

Images added & captions by K.S.Doig



The Celts dominated Mid and Western Europe for a thousand years. But it is only recently that the importance of Celtic influence on the cultural, linguistic and artistic development of Europe. The Celts as an identifiable race or ethnic group have long since disappeared, except in places such as Ireland and the Scottish Highlands.


The Celts transmitted their culture orally, never writing down history or facts. This accounts for the extreme lack of knowledge about them prior to their contact with the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome. They were generally well educated, particularly on topics such as religion, philosophy, geography and astronomy. The Romans often employed Celtic tutors for their sons.


The bravery of the Celts in battle is legendary. They often spurned body armor, going naked into battle. Celtic society was typically more equal in terms of gender roles. Women were on more or less equal footing as men, being accomplished warriors, merchants and rulers.


Scotland

Early Europe

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