Showing posts with label mutual intelligibility. Show all posts
Showing posts with label mutual intelligibility. Show all posts

02 June 2011

NETHERLANDIC SERIES: POST III (FRISIAN'S POSITION IN THE GMC LANGUAGES)

The Position of Frisian in the Germanic Language


Published, edited & formatted by Kenneth S. Doig


Charlotte Gooskens and Wilbert Heeringa (websource http://www.let.rug.nl/~heeringa/dialectology/papers/tdg03.pdf)
1. Introduction
Among the Germanic varieties the Frisian varieties in the Dutch province
of Friesland have their own position. The Frisians are proud of their
language and more than 350,000 inhabitants of the province of Friesland
speak Frisian every day. Heeringa (2004) shows that among the dialects in
the Dutch language area the Frisian varieties are most distant with respect

MUTUAL INTELLIGIBILITY


Mutual intelligibility

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
          Published, edited & formatted by Kenneth S. Doig
In linguistics, mutual intelligibility is recognized as a relationship between languages in which speakers of different but related languages can readily understand each other without intentional study or extraordinary effort. It is sometimes used as a criterion for distinguishing languages from dialects, though sociolinguistic factors are also important.

06 May 2011

Linguistic Lesson-Series:Dialect continuum & Koiné languages


Dialect continuum
From Wikipedia

Published, edited and formatted by Kenneth S. Doig, 6 may 2011 
dialect continuum, or dialect area, was defined by Leonard Bloomfield as a range of dialects spoken across some geographical area that differ only slightly between neighboring areas, but as one travels in any direction, these differences accumulate such that speakers from opposite ends of the continuum are no longermutually intelligible. The lines we can draw between areas that differ with respect to any feature of language are called isoglosses.According to the Ausbausprache – Abstandsprache – Dachsprache paradigm, these dialects can be considered Abstandsprachen (i.e., as stand-alone languages). However, they can be seen as dialects of a single language, provided that a common standard language, through which communication is possible, exists.
There are occasions when various nations of the same linguistic origins occupy the same territory and thus speak the same dialect, but have split standard languages located at different parts of the continuum, sometimes causing doubt as to precisely which language is the dialect in question a property. Examples include regions such as Kashmir in which local Muslims declare their language Urdu; Sikhs, Punjabi; and Hindus, Hindi. Similar complications arise across much of the former Yugoslavia whereby Bosniaks, Croatsand Serbs may speak the same dialect within the same region, yet all have separate standard languages.

Linguistic Lesson-Series


Mutual intelligibility
From Wikipedia
 Published, edited, formatted by Kenneth S. Doig,   6 may 2011
In linguistics, mutual intelligibility is recognized as a relationship between languages in which speakers of different but related languages can readily understand each other without intentional study or extraordinary effort. It is sometimes used as a criterion for distinguishing languages from dialects, though sociolinguistic factors are also important.

03 May 2011

Netherlandic series: Post VIII Afrikaans & Standard-Dutch

Differences between Afrikaans and Dutch

Posted, edited and formatted by Kenneth S. Doig
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Dutch and Afrikaans
Afrikaans is a daughter language of Dutch and —contrary to Belgian Dutch and Surinamese Dutch— a

13 April 2011

The Mutual Intelligibility of the 3 Major, Mainland Scandinavian (North-Gmc) Languages

Preface

by Kenneth S. Doig

North-Germanic (NGmc), also called the following; 1. "Scandinavian" (in my opinion, not a very good apellation as many people don't realized that Scandinavia only refers to the peninsula upon which Sweden and Norway lie, but the words "Scandinavia" & "Scandinavian" are virtually always used for Denmark, and often for Iceland, Finland & the Faroe Islands in addition to Norway & Sweden. 2 Nordic languages. "Nordic" usually refers to a certain racial

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