Showing posts with label futhorc. Show all posts
Showing posts with label futhorc. Show all posts

03 October 2011

RUNIC ALPHABETS

PUBLISHED BY KENNETH S. DOIG

 


Runic Alphabets

Runes are also called Futhark, which actually is an analogue to our "alphabet", in that f, u, th, a, r, and k are the first 6 Runic letters, while alpha and beta are the first 2 Greek letters. Why this order? It must have had some mneumonic function that was not preserved. (Just like why aleph, beth, and gimmel are the first 3 letters in Phoenician/Ugaritic).

17 August 2011

LANGUAGES - RUNIC ALPHABET

Wóðdinaz gab uns rúnanz

PUBLISHED BY KENNETH S. DOIG


The Runic alphabets are a set of related alphabets using letters (known as runes), formerly used to write Germanic languages before and shortly after the Christianization of Scandinavia and the British Isles. The Scandinavian variants are also known as Futhark (or fuþark, derived from their first six letters: F, U, Þ, A, R, and K); the Anglo-Saxon variant as Futhorc (due to sound changes undergone in Old English by the same six letters)..



left: Younger Futhark inscription on the Vaksala Runestone

LANGUAGES - OLD ENGLISH

PUBLISHED BY KENNETH S. DOIG




Old English is often erroneously used to refer to any form of English other than Modern English. The term Old English does not refer to varieties of Early Modern English such as are found in Shakespeare or the King James Bible, nor does it refer to Middle English, the language of Chaucer and his contemporaries.

 The following timeline helps place the history of the English language in context. The dates used are approximate dates. It is inaccurate to state that everyone stopped speaking Old English in 1099, and woke up on New Year's Day of 1100 speaking Middle English. Language change is gradual, and cannot be as easily demarcated as historical or political events are.
450–1100 : Old English (Anglo-Saxon) – The language of Beowulf.1100–1500 : Middle English – The language of Chaucer.1500–1650: Early Modern English (or Renaissance English) – The language of Shakespeare.1650–present : Modern English (or Present-Day English) – The language as spoken today.

Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon, Old English: Englisc) is an early form of the English

02 June 2011

YNGRE FUTHARK (RUNES GALORE)

The Younger Futhark

Publish, edited, formatted by Kenneth S. Doig

From Wikipedia

The Younger Futhark, also called Scandinavian runes, is a runic alphabet, a reduced form of the Elder Futhark, consisting of only 16 characters, in use from ca. 800 CE. The reduction, paradoxically, happened at the same time as phonetic changes led to a greater number of different phonemes in the spoken language, when Proto-Norse evolved into Old Norse.
Thus, the language included distinct sounds and minimal pairs which were not separate in writing. Also, since the writing custom avoided having the same rune twice in consecutive order, the spoken distinction between long and short vowels were not retained in writing, either. The only real reason for using the same rune consecutively, would be when it represented different sounds following each other, such as carving kunuur for the name Gunvor.

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