Showing posts with label baltic troy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label baltic troy. Show all posts

15 August 2011

Indo-European Languages : Balto-Slavic Family


Published by Kenneth S. Doig


The Balto-Slavic languages are spoken mainly in Eastern Europe; they were not attested until late in the first millennium AD. There are two major groups: Baltic, and Slavic. These two are generally agreed to be closely related to one another and, as a whole, they have always been spoken in the same geographic area, ranging from what is now eastern Germany to modern-day Russia. However, Baltic languages have exchanged "popularity" with Slavic languages:


 Baltic languages were originally spoken over a much wider area than is now the case, and Slavic languages were originally spoken in a much smaller area. Nowadays, the territory occupied by speakers of Slavic languages has expanded considerably, whereas the territory dominated by speakers of Baltic languages has shrunk to a very small region encompassed by the countries of Latvia and Lithuania.

21 July 2011

ÅLAND ISLANDS : MIDWAY BETWEEN STOCKHOLM AND FINLAND (Ahvenanmaa)

PUBLISHED BY KENNETH S. DOIG




Åland's poisition on Neuromap[1] & Worldmap
[1] north+European= "neuro" "Seuromap"
southern Europe
The Parliament of Åland
Åland, situated at southern end of
Gulf of Bothnia, midway between the
Finnish & Swedish mainland. 



The Åland Islands during the Crimean War

The Åland Islands are governed according to the Act on the Autonomy of Åland and international treaties. These laws guarantee the islands' autonomy from Finland, which has ultimate sovereignty over them, as well as a demilitarized status. The Government of Åland, or Landskapsregering, answers to the Parliament of Åland, or Lagting, in accordance with the principles of parliamentarism.

05 July 2011

HOMERIC LEGEND

Achaean Warrior




Published, edited, formatted & images added by K.S. Doig
Preface by K.S. Doig


Never once does Homer refer to the Greeks or Greece by the term "Greek" or "Greece" as those names are of a minor northwestern Hellenic tribe. We get the names "Greece" and "Greek" from the Romans. Apparently one of the first Hellenic tribes with which they came into contact with were the "Graikhos" or something similar to that. So the Romans called all Hellenes the Latinized forms, "graeci" (pronounced [grigh-kee] and the land "Graecia" [grigh-kee-a]) Today the Greeks usually refer to themselves as "Hellenes", "Hellenic" and the nation as "Hellas". Homer uses oftenest, the term of the dominant tribe of that period, the Achaeans  [ah-kay-unz], he also uses the term "Danaan" and "Argives" from the city-state of Argos.
By K. Doig

800 BC: Homeric writings
Two of the classics of Western literature are the 'Iliad' and 'The Odyssey', both of which have been ascribed to a blind poet named Homer. Very little is known about Homer, though some scholars believe he lived between 850 and 750 BC. Others believe he is merely a legend, since the blind seer or poet is a common figure in ancient Greek literature. These poems began as part of an oral tradition, and the stories were retold over the centuries before being written down.

20 May 2011

THE ETYMOLOGIES THAT VINCI GIVES ARE 100% ABSOLUTE EGREGIOUS MISTAKES, TOO MANY TO BE ACCIDENTAL, THERE IS NO WAY A PhD & A TRAINED CLASSICIST COULD HAVE MADE SO MANY, VERY BASIC ETYMOLOGICAL MISTAKES. IT BORDERS ON INTELLECTUAL FRAUD!



Published, formatted, research, critiqued, edited and images added by Kenneth S. Doig

The real scene of the Iliad and the Odyssey can be identified not in the Mediterranean Sea, where it proves to be weakened by many incongruities, but in the north of Europe. The sagas that gave rise to the two poems came from the Baltic regions, where the Bronze Age flourished in the 2nd millennium B. C. and many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can still be identified. The blond seafarers who founded the Mycenaean civilization in the 16th century B. C. brought these tales from Scandinavia to Greece after the decline of the "climatic optimum". Then they rebuilt their original world, where the Trojan War and many other mythological events had taken place, in the Mediterranean; through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the feats performed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved, and handed down to the following ages. This key allows us to easily open many doors that have been shut tight until now, as well as to consider the age-old question of the Indo-European diaspora and the origin of the Greek civilization from a new perspective.

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