Showing posts with label Verner's law. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Verner's law. Show all posts

28 June 2015

Germanic parent-language



Published, edited, images added & annotations/comments (in red) by Kenneth S. Doig
(from Wikipedia)

(at the above-referenced link, you can read the original documents with all its footnotes, citations & references)
(websource)

15 March 2014

The Proto-Germanic language; Grimm and Bopp



Published, edited, formatted, images added, annotations & rephrasing (in red) by Kenneth S. Doig

(source 
The Encyclopedia of Authentic Hinduism by H.D. Swami Prakashanand Saraswati (the most important site on Hinduism, the Upanishads, modern Physics, Bhartiya, Sanatan Dharm and more))


(Proto-, an oft-used prefix, here, we discuss proto-languages, i.e., the hypothetical ancestor/parent for any given language. Usually, the comparative-method "CM" is used. 
Any word, unbound or unbound morpheme, are prepended by an apostrophe /*/, in order to convey to readers that, a word, letter, etc., has never been (to our knowledge)attested in written form. 

The attestation must have been written contemporaneously, back "in the day". If there be no written record [attestation], from that earlier time, linguists use the CM [there are other methods]. They reconstruct an unattested word or sound. 

06 September 2011

MAJOR CHANGES FROM PIE (PROTO-INDO-EUROPEAN) TO PGMC (PROTO-GERMANIC) : GRIMM'S LAW & VERNER'S LAW

by John Lawler
Program in Linguistics * University of Michigan
with Kevin McGowan
Copyright © 1993-1997 The Eclectic Company
For non-commercial use only 

PUBLISHED, EDITED, FORMATTED, IMAGES ADDED & CAPTIONS BY KENNETH S. DOIG
WESTERN INDO-EUROPEAN
 SUB-GROUPS, c. 1000 BC

  1. Major Changes from I-E to Germanic 

    1. Large number of words without known IE cognates. Some NE forms include broad, drink, drive, fowl, hold, meat, rain, and wife.

14 April 2011

germanic linguistics-laws, Grimm's, Verner's, etc. Important to know for gmc linguistics




 
 
 
 
Sound Change
 
breakthrough in comparative linguistics initiated by Danish scholar Rasmus Rask and German linguist Jacob Grimm 
-         research on relationship between Germanic languages and the rest of Indo-European
-         in 1786 William Jones already said:
…the Gothic (Germanic) … though blended with a very different idiom, had the same origin with the Sanskrit.                                                                                             
-         Grimm and Rask investigated this relationship of correspondences between Germanic
and the classical I-E (Indo-European) languages
àtheir goal: to show Germanic is a part of the I-E language family
àinterest especially on differences in pronunciation of Germanic
 result was published in 1818 and 1819
àwork proved Germanic languages are part of I-E
àprovided set of systematic sound changes which differentiated Germanic languages
    from classical languages
àsimilar set of sound changes differentiating German from the rest of Germanic
àset of systematic changes is called Grimm`s Law (in German: First Germanic
    Sound Shift) 

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