Showing posts with label Old Swedish. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Old Swedish. Show all posts

16 October 2011

AMERICAN RUNESTONE : AN UNSOPHISTICATED FRAUD : I'D BET MY LIFE ON IT!


PUBLISHED, FORMATTED, EDITED AND ANNOTATED (IN RED) BY KENNETH S. DOIG

(There are a lot of grammatical errors as Mr. Nordling was not too good at English)
The Norseman 
The Kensington Stone - Fiction or Historical Truth? (Without a doubt, fiction, and bad fiction too)

(This article was published by Carl O. Nordling in The Norseman in 1957.) 

CAN a language develop independently among a small group of people till it differs considerably from the original one? Of course it can, but how long does it take, would seven years be enough for a manifest change? This is just one of the questions that are posed by the Kensington Stone. 

03 October 2011

RUNIC ALPHABETS

PUBLISHED BY KENNETH S. DOIG

 


Runic Alphabets

Runes are also called Futhark, which actually is an analogue to our "alphabet", in that f, u, th, a, r, and k are the first 6 Runic letters, while alpha and beta are the first 2 Greek letters. Why this order? It must have had some mneumonic function that was not preserved. (Just like why aleph, beth, and gimmel are the first 3 letters in Phoenician/Ugaritic).

19 April 2011

Donsk Tunga

Donsk tunga
 
Vg 135, Hassla.jpg
Old Norse is a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300.
The changing processes that distinguish Old Norse from its older form, Proto-Norse, were mostly concluded around the 8th century, and another transitional period that led up to the modern descendants of Old Norse (i.e., the modern North Germanic languages) started in the mid- to late 14th century, thereby ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute. For instance, one can still find written Old Norse well into the 15th century.

The first major dialectal distinctions in the language arose in the Old East Norse, Old West Norse, and Old Gutnish dialects. No clear geographical boundary exists between the Eastern and Western dialects. Old East Norse traits were found in eastern Norway, and Old West Norse traits were found in western Sweden. Most speakers of Old Norse dialects spoke the

01 April 2011

Intro to old-norse

Modern descendantsThe modern descendants of the Old West Norse dialect are the West Scandinavian languages of Icelandic, Faroese, Norwegian and the extinct Norn language of the Orkney and the Shetland Islands; the descendants of the Old East Norse dialect are the East Scandinavian languages of Danish and Swedish. Norwegian is descended from Old West Norse, but over the centuries it has been heavily influenced by East Norse, particularly during the Denmark-Norway union.


Old Norse is a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300.
The changing processes that distinguish Old Norse from its older form, Proto-Norse, were mostly concluded around the 8th century, and another transitional period that led up to the modern descendants of Old Norse (i.e., the modern North Germanic languages) started in the mid- to late 14th century, thereby ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute. For instance, one can still find written Old Norse well into the 15th century.
The first major dialectal distinctions in the language arose in the Old East Norse, Old West Norse, and Old Gutnish dialects. No clear geographical boundary exists between the Eastern and Western dialects. Old East Norse traits were found in eastern Norway, and Old West Norse traits were found in western Sweden. Most speakers of Old Norse dialects spoke the Old East Norse dialect originating in what are present-day Denmark and Sweden. Old Gutnish, the more obscure dialectal branch, is sometimes included in the Old East Norse dialect due to geographical associations. It shares traits with both Old West Norse and Old East Norse but had also developed on its own.


The 12th century Icelandic Gray Goose Laws state that Swedes, Norwegians, Icelanders and Danes

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