Showing posts with label Germanic gods. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Germanic gods. Show all posts

21 March 2013

Gothonic or "Suebo-Teutonic" or "Scando-Germanic" :Germanic religion and mythology







Published, formatted, properly italicized, books marked, punctuated in proper linguistic-academic writing-format, fact-checked, images added & annotations/commentary(in red) by Kenneth S.Doig  

 
Germanic religion and mythology, complex of stories, lore, and beliefs about the gods and the nature of the cosmos developed by the Germanic-speaking peoples before their conversion to Christianity.

Germanic culture extended, at various times, from the Black Sea to Greenland, or even the North American continent. Germanic religion played an important role in shaping the civilization of Europe. 

12 August 2011

THE GERMANIC GODS, THE *ANSIWIZ, LATER IN OLD ENGLISH CALLED THE 'ÉSE' AND BY THE NORSE, 'ÆSIR' : THEY ARE NOT DIFFERENT WORDS, JUST DIFFERENT PRONUNCIATIONS BY DIFFERENT TRIBES AT DIFFERENT TIMES

Published, partially corrected & prefaced by Kenneth S. Doig





Whoever wrote this gave supremacy to the later Norse which were generally pronounced less like the original Proto-Germanic (PGmc) forms. The reason we know so much more about the Norse form of the religion, not all gods were equally honored everywhere, in fact the Goths who'd left Scandinavia c. 200 BC had not even heard of Woden as he had not been born on an Island next to Jutland, Fyn for about 300 more years. Skeletons, writing, artifacts found in Scandinavia that have been dated to before 300 AD are by no means always Norse, since ALL Germanic tribes originate in Scandinavia. So, if we find a statue of Thunor (Thor) in southern Sweden dating back to 300 BC, it could not be called Norse, as the tribes had not begun dividing up and leaving Scandinavia for centuries. Also, the reason we know so much more about the Scandinavia/Norse version is that they were converted so much later, the Swedes were pagan until 1100AD, Norwegian and Danes c. 750-900 AD. There were literate Catholic monks there for centuries recording all this, whereas the Goths were converted c. 300 AD, the Franks c. 450 AD, the Anglo-Saxons 600-700 AD. I cannot vouch for the linguistic accuracy of this article, just remember, Odin was called Woden for at least 600 years before being called "Odin". Same with Thunor and Thor. K.S.Doig P.S. I have found so many mistakes in meaning, pronunciation, etymology, I am giving you this article to see what bad history, written by a non-linguist looks like. PPS, after re-reading it, I've decided the writer is an IDIOT! K.Doig


BAD HISTORY BECAUSE WHOEVER WROTE THIS KNOWS NOTHING OF GERMANIC LINGUISTICS AND MAKES LAZY ASSUMPTIONS, NOT WILLING TO INVESTIGATE WORDS FOR HERSELF. EXAMPLE, SHE STATES "DEUTSCHLAND IS NAMES AFTER THE GOD TÝR. ODD BECAUSE THE OLD-HIGH GERMANS CALLED TÝR 'ZÍU' (TSEE-OO), SO THEN DEUTSCHLAND SHOULD BE '**ZEUTSCHLAND' OR '**ZIUTSCHLAND' The word "deutsch" (our word "Dutch")

09 May 2011

Some interesting theories on Odin´s/Woden´s origin and if whether he was an historic person


Preface
by Kenneth S. Doig

It appears that whoever wrote this  does not know too much about Germanic and North-Germanic (NGmc) phonology or historical phonology. He keeps stating that ancient people, like to Romans and others recored people with the name Odin, for one exanple. Linguist have been in complete agreement that the name Odin, Oðinn, Othon or whatever and any Norse/NGmc form of Oden/Odin without the initial W is descended from the earlier Proto-Germanic (PGmc) word, *Wodenaz, *Wōđanaz or similar form, but it started with the sound W.  This loss of the W-sound occurred around 600AD. But taht said, the article has some other good theories and is intersting.
K.S. Doig
 Loss of initial /j/ (see "year" above), and also of /w/ before a round vowel. Our form from OE, "Woden", soundwise is closer to the original word than is Odin.
 Was Odin a genuine human being?

22 April 2011

Baldr/Baldur/Balder/Baldor (the Bold)

 

Baldr

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Each arrow overshot his head" (1902) by Elmer Boyd Smith.
Baldr (also Balder, Baldur) is a god in Norse mythology. (Note, the modern icelandic -ur & the old-norse -r-endings on the name Baldur/Baldr are NOT casemarkers/morphological endings but part of the name itself, example ek em Baldr [I am Balder], ek se Baldr [I see Balder], ek gaf et [early old-norse 'it'] Baldri [I have it to Balder], ek hef geit Baldrs [I have Balder's goat] by Kenneth S. Doig)
In the 12th century, Danish accounts by Saxo Grammaticus and other Danish Latin chroniclers recorded a euhemerized account of his story. Compiled in Iceland in the 13th century, but based on much older Old Norse poetry, the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda contain numerous references to the death of Baldr as both a great tragedy to the Æsir and a harbinger of Ragnarök.

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